Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Denizens along the drive



An unassuming abode, yes.  
The term "tired" comes to mind.


Commerce and commuters alike mind their P's + Q's at the 4-way stop, just left of this photo.  Feed-lots and industrial outcroppings vie for position, little more than a stone's throw away. 

But here, on what appears to be one man's acre, the little home sits resolute.  Endearing.  

As I have near every weekday, I'm drawn to that little home ... its occupant an unknown, overalls-clad elder in a wide-brim hat.  Head bowed, he's usually accompanied about the yard by a smiling dog of uncertain descent.

Every now and then, a U.S. Flag - held erect between the coils of his chain-link fence - reminds us busy folk what matters.

A near scare late last Fall:  
An I.V. pole appeared on the little porch, but no evidence of the man.

A few days later, an anemic yellow porch light revealed two large "work" socks hung to dry on the pole's clips.
A sigh of relief.


* * *

A couple of weeks ago, while waiting my turn at the 4-way, I waved.  Again, the next day... and the day after.  Mine's become a habit.

No, I've no idea why.
... a carefully, careless gesture.  Some days, little more than 3-4 fingers raised off the steering column.  I strive for nonchalance.  
Eyes straight ahead I test my peripheral vision ... is the man out and about?


Then last week, a thought.  
What on earth will I do if he waves back?
... What if he approaches the fence?

My assumptions are precious ... best left undisturbed.
Someday, sure.  A shiny new 'convenience' store will likely occupy that parcel.

But, if given the chance?
I'm pretty sure I'd just say, "Thank you."

"Thank you for keeping it real.  
Please, don't be going anywhere soon."






    

26 comments:

  1. What a great essay to read first thing this morning! Keep waving, and please give us an update now and then!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will! Thank you for your encouragement, Terri!

      Delete
  2. What a touching story. I would love to see him and waved to him and if he did come to the fence I would stop to talk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish I were that outgoing, Sandra. That, and not so deadline oriented; always in a hurry.

      Delete
  3. Your kindness, concern, and thoughtfulness is always admirable. A rare breed in this cold and uncaring world.

    I found myself wishing that you would ride past my rural abode during your daily journey. It would be a reassuring gesture to know that someone is aware of my existence. If I ever dropped dead out here, the wolves would devour me...and my bones wouldn't be found for half a century.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your second paragraph brought tears to my eyes, Jon. I wish I could, as well.

      Until that time, I'll have to content myself with imagery and a cyber salute. "Here's to good friends!"

      Delete
  4. I love that you waved! I bet he looks forward to that brief interaction even though he mightt not acknowledge it. I bet he has a wonderful story to share, wouldn't it be neat if he shared it with you?

    Betty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure he's even noticed, Betty! Wonder if I shouldn't try and be a little less subtle? :)

      Call me 'chicken', but I'm afraid he might think me a crackpot ... or be just another curmudgeon.

      Delete
  5. The same commute day after day does tend to make us wonder about the things and people we see. I traveled the same route well over 15 years and often noticed the changes along the way. Nice to wave at someone just about anytime. Down home where my grand folks lived you never went by anyone on their porch or in a car without a friendly wave. Life would be much better if we all lived that way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so true! I grew used to that sort of congeniality when I lived in West Texas and was amazed when, after I moved to Florida, that sentiment wasn't echoed.

      Delete
  6. One of your best lady. You stir some great thoughts and a big smile, all over me!
    THANKS! U DONE GOOD!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, kind sir. I love to think, something I said makes you smile!

      Delete
  7. Thank you for reminding me what is important, being the one that waves first, patriotism and caring about the elderly. Great post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary, you're such an encourager. I may have to step up my game. :)

      Delete
  8. Such an uplifting story. I am glad you shared it. I would want to know that people would wave at me too! I make up stories about people in the houses I pass by everyday!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love that you, too, make up stories about strangers' lives! Some days I imagine a diminutive lady in a faded housecoat; but usually, it's the old man alone, standing before an old gas stove resolutely stirring a pan of soup.

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. That means a lot to me, Gayle. Thank you for saying so!

      Delete
  10. What a wonderful post! We sometimes get so wound up in our own personal car cocoon as we're rushing from here to there that we don't notice the things and what's more, the people, around us. I love that you've started to wave to him. I'd be tempted to bake him some cookies or something. He may not just be a stranger; he could be a dear friend you haven't made yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a concept!
      ...Then again, I'm such a coward, I might have to break the ice with a holiday card: "Wishes from the crackpot in the Camry."

      BTW, I just finished your book last eve. 5 stars, lady!!!

      Delete
  11. To know somebody cares can sometimes make all the difference indeed. That little home and it's occupant are endearing because you noticed and that counts for a lot more than a convenience store.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love how you 'get' it, Taryterre. Sometimes I wonder why it's so easy for me to feel affection -- protective, even, for a stranger ... unlike those with whom I brush shoulders everyday.

      Delete
  12. Your keen eye picked out this lone soul and his dog and home. I would love to visit such a place. But I am sure your wave and smile make ones day much better. It is nice to be cared about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is. Thank you for being such a great example, Anne!

      Delete
  13. If he's like the old farmers around here, his hands are usually usually full or around a hoe or rake doing work.
    I wave at people I pass in the country for no reason too.
    And thanks for the shoutout on Jacks blog.
    R

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw, it's nice to hear you wave at fellow travelers, too! It's a shame that sort of behavior isn't natural in all parts of the country. (Jus' saying ...)

      Delete

Thanks so much for dropping by! Your words are like hugs from afar.... and who doesn't love a hug!